Review: The Incom­plete Book of Running

The Incomplete Book of Running
The Incom­plete Book of Run­ning by Peter Sagal
My rat­ing: 5 of 5 stars

Uplift­ing book from an uplift­ing author, despite the tough per­son­al peri­od that he had to go through.
The book gave me a new per­spec­tive on run­ning, the abil­i­ty to do it for oth­ers and to find joy in such a sim­ple activ­i­ty.
I had nev­er heard of the pod­cast, of which the author is a host and I will for sure check it out, since I did quite enjoy the type of humor, it was sub­tle but bru­tal at the same time. Because of this book, I signed up for the local run­ning blind organ­i­sa­tion, that con­nects (near)blind peo­ple with vol­un­teers that would like to help said peo­ple to go and run again and let the oth­ers be their eyes. It makes me feel good, know­ing some­thing like this exists and makes me less anx­ious to become blind.

View all my reviews

Review: How to Eat

How to Eat
How to Eat by Thich Nhat Hanh
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

After fin­ish­ing the book on the syn­er­gies of medi­a­tion and run­ning (Run­ning with the Mind of Med­i­ta­tion: Lessons for Train­ing Body and Mind), I decid­ed to fol­low up with the syn­er­gies of med­i­ta­tion and eat­ing. The strengths of this book are the ways in which to be focussing on express­ing the grat­i­tude of your every­day meal. At times, my mind can be absorbed by thoughts on food and I have a hard time think­ing of any­thing else. This does­n’t only hap­pen when I am hun­gry, because then it would make sense, but it is like there are par­a­sites in my brain that can only think of food. This book has helped in get­ting a bet­ter atti­tude and rela­tion­ship with my food, but I find the con­tent to be a bit short and dry. Per­haps because every­thing is brought down to the essen­tials, but I would have appre­ci­at­ed some more exam­ples or appli­ca­tions. Over­all, one that might be help­ful to relis­ten, if I ever find I lose touch with my eat­ing habits.

View all my reviews

Review: The Ele­ments of Elo­quence: How to Turn the Per­fect Eng­lish Phrase

The Elements of Eloquence: How to Turn the Perfect English Phrase
The Ele­ments of Elo­quence: How to Turn the Per­fect Eng­lish Phrase by Mark Forsyth
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

This book was in my Audi­ble queue for a long time and I can’t remem­ber for the life of me how I got in con­tact with it. Boy, was I glad I did and I am very grate­ful to my for­mer self. This was a great book that let me appre­ci­ate lit­er­a­ture and writ­ing in gen­er­al. Like an enthu­si­as­tic teacher with a pas­sion for the writ­ten word, that is rather infec­tive and makes you excit­ed your­self. It did give me insight in the var­i­ous ways to improve my rhymes and learn about the beau­ty of lan­guage instead of just its effec­tive­ness. How­ev­er, I found that due to the sheer vol­ume of top­ics dis­cussed that they are not well remem­bered, so it would be help­ful to read a sum­ma­ry again. Or to write one myself and keep only the things I found use­ful myself.
The way the author linked two sequen­tial top­ics was very tact­ful­ly done and often quite humor­ous. Rec­om­mend­ed book.

View all my reviews

Review: Zen and the Art of Disc Golf

Zen and the Art of Disc Golf
Zen and the Art of Disc Golf by Patrick McCormick
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

Appre­ci­at­ed the sim­i­lar­i­ties between play­ing dis­c­golf and being in the here and now; to focus only on the shot you are about to make. I do think you would have to be a more than aver­age disc golf play­er to get the most out of this book and I am not sure if I meet those require­ments. It was an enjoy­able read, espe­cial­ly while play­ing a solo round of dis­c­golf and try­ing to apply the lessons as soon as I heard them. I think this is true for many applied-type of books, ones that involve ‘mind­less’ tasks, like run­ning and cook­ing. I mean, I can’t wait to read the Kitchen con­fi­den­tial while mak­ing some nice stews.

View all my reviews

Review: Run­ning with the Mind of Med­i­ta­tion: Lessons for Train­ing Body and Mind

Running with the Mind of Meditation: Lessons for Training Body and Mind
Run­ning with the Mind of Med­i­ta­tion: Lessons for Train­ing Body and Mind by Saky­ong Mipham
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

I found this to be a very inspi­ra­tional book and I had a desire to share it with oth­ers. I looked up the author, which is a bud­dhist leader, which all have the for­mal title ‘Rin­poche’. This word to me sounds quite jol­ly to me and do like it. How­ev­er, the author is cur­rent­ly under inves­ti­ga­tion for some #metoo claims. I do think being in a posi­tion like his, that chances are high for them to be true, but who knows. It left a real sour taste and I imme­di­ate­ly lost the desire to share the book. How­ev­er, the con­cept of the four stages, the tiger, lion, garu­da (armed-bird) and drag­on, were real­ly intrigu­ing. This entices me to read anoth­er book about the Bud­dhis­tic teach­ings and see what I res­onate with.

View all my reviews

Review: Sophie’s World

Sophie's World
Sophie’s World by Jostein Gaarder
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

I must say that this is a very unique book and I wish that I read it when I was the age of the main char­ac­ter, turn­ing fif­teen. It intro­duces you to so many cool con­cepts and new per­spec­tive that I think a lot of chil­dren that have a curi­ous nature would ben­e­fit from. I am not sure as to mark it rec­om­mend­ed read­ing for every high school stu­dent, but I think it makes for a great book to dis­cuss. Over­all great book with lots of metaphors, mak­ing phi­los­o­phy eas­i­er to grasp and over­all a nice sto­ry with lots of meta-awareness!

View all my reviews

Review: Run­ning with the Kenyans: Pas­sion, Adven­ture, and the Secrets of the Fastest Peo­ple on Earth

Running with the Kenyans: Passion, Adventure, and the Secrets of the Fastest People on Earth
Run­ning with the Kenyans: Pas­sion, Adven­ture, and the Secrets of the Fastest Peo­ple on Earth by Adha­ranand Finn
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

The secret is that there is no secret, just a myr­i­ad of help­ful cul­tur­al and envi­ron­men­tal fac­tors of which not a sin­gle one is the dri­ving force. Def­i­nite­ly, this book has helped me put the recent break­ing of the two hour marathon lim­it in a cer­tain per­spec­tive. Mr. Kip­choge is def­i­nite­ly a prod­uct of his sur­round­ings and cul­ture, as we all are. How­ev­er, now it is clear what drove him to make these claims and put every­thing on the line to make it so. Most of all it was a great trav­el sto­ry and it enthu­si­asts me to head down south there once myself. 

View all my reviews

Review: The Ter­ri­ble and Won­der­ful Rea­sons Why I Run Long Distances

The Terrible and Wonderful Reasons Why I Run Long Distances
The Ter­ri­ble and Won­der­ful Rea­sons Why I Run Long Dis­tances by Matthew Inman
My rat­ing: 5 of 5 stars

Great moti­va­tion­al and relat­able com­ic from The Oat­meal.
Dosed with plen­ty of humor, it takes very lit­tle time to read through this com­ic.
Which is great for rainy days, in which you strug­gle to go out­doors for a run. In the past I came across a short­er ver­sion of this book online and when I found out there was more, I did­n’t hes­i­tate to get my hands of a copy.
I am not famil­iar with the oth­er comics of the author, but I do like his style. 

The part about the DO or DO NOT was a bit con­fus­ing at times, since it was play­ing with sar­casm and not always was that obvious. 

View all my reviews

Review: Altered Traits: Sci­ence Reveals How Med­i­ta­tion Changes Your Mind, Brain, and Body

Altered Traits: Science Reveals How Meditation Changes Your Mind, Brain, and Body
Altered Traits: Sci­ence Reveals How Med­i­ta­tion Changes Your Mind, Brain, and Body by Daniel Gole­man
My rat­ing: 4 of 5 stars

This book tries to explain the ben­e­fits and what is and isn’t proven about med­i­ta­tion. I found it to be very help­ful know­ing the sci­en­tif­ic back­ground in order to estab­lish a new rou­tine. Some­how, the ratio­nal part of my mind needs to be con­vinced of the ben­e­fits for me to make even an attempt.
In the end it comes down to prac­tice and dis­ci­pline. There exists lit­tle doubt that med­i­ta­tion is ben­e­fi­cial, it is just a mat­ter of mak­ing it a habit to reap the ben­e­fits and fine­tune the prac­tice when you are more expe­ri­enced. I do think it can help to focus and resist dis­trac­tions, to get more eas­i­ly into a flow and gath­er your thoughts when you find your­self over­whelmed by what life throws at you.

View all my reviews

Review: How Bad Do You Want It?: Mas­ter­ing the Psy­chol­o­gy of Mind Over Muscle

How Bad Do You Want It?: Mastering the Psychology of Mind Over Muscle
How Bad Do You Want It?: Mas­ter­ing the Psy­chol­o­gy of Mind Over Mus­cle by Matt Fitzger­ald
My rat­ing: 5 of 5 stars

Great insights in what moti­vates peo­ple and ath­letes in par­tic­u­lar, with their dri­ve to excel in endurance events! I enjoyed the vari­ety in the exam­ples, includ­ing sto­ries from sports that I nev­er con­sid­ered to be that inter­est­ing, but in the end it is about peo­ple aim­ing to achieve their goals and see­ing how they some­times hold them­selves back sub­con­cious­ly. The sto­ry about the per­son get­ting shot while out on a hunt­ing trip, is the type of unex­pect­ed thing that can change your life for good and to see this type of come­back is heart­warm­ing. This is def­i­nite­ly a book that I would like to read again in the future when I am train­ing for a par­tic­u­lar event that is close to my heart.

View all my reviews