Review: What We Talk about When We Talk about Books: The His­to­ry and Future of Read­ing

What We Talk about When We Talk about Books: The History and Future of Reading
What We Talk about When We Talk about Books: The His­to­ry and Future of Read­ing by Leah Price
My rat­ing: 5 of 5 stars

I found it to be a delight to lis­ten to this book out on a run, while real­iz­ing how I’ve incor­po­rat­ed more read­ing in my life through the abil­i­ty of being able to lis­ten simul­ta­ne­ous­ly and get lost in a vir­tu­al world as I do in the real world by foot. For me, there were a few fun­ny coin­ci­dences that I came across, one was talk­ing about the book Too Much Hap­pi­ness, which I planned to read this month for a book­club, but it got can­celled due to the coro­n­avirus con­cerns. The pas­sage was about bil­bio­ther­a­py and mis­un­der­stand­ing the book’s title as a self-help book. The prac­tice of doc­tors and psy­chi­a­trists pre­scrib­ing books as part of a cure is not a bad thought at all. I do think that I owe a very large por­tion of my cur­rent healthy lifestyle through read­ing, some­thing that I doubt would have hap­pened if a doc­tor told me so. Anoth­er fun fact was con­cern­ing the very first edi­tion of the veg­e­tar­i­an cook­book being made out of parch­ment, thus from dead ani­mals. Guten­berg’s press was most­ly used for sin­gle sheets indul­gences, to reduce one’s sins. And not for print­ing bibles what I had always assumed, so lots of nuggets and over­all it helped me appre­ci­ate how lucky I am to find myself in a time where one can read by lis­ten­ing. This book also dis­cussed its uses, virtues and how it impacts com­mu­ni­ties small and large. In the future I would like to have a phys­i­cal copy on my shelves.

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